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玉山群峰線

Biological Accidental Injury

Bee sting

Symptoms

  1. Localized reaction: Redness, swelling, hotness, pain, or minor itching. 
  2. Toxic reaction: Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, difficulty in swallowing, seizure, unconsciousness, fever, swelling, decreased blood pressure, and shock, etc. 
  3.  Allergic reaction: Dry cough, swelling of the eyelids, itching, hives, breathing difficulty, decreased blood pressure, and coma, etc.

Treatment

  1. Use a needle to remove the stinger
  2. Use soapy water or disinfectant to clean the wound
  3. Cold compress to reduce swelling and itching
  4. Apply epinephrine
  5. For seriously affected patients, please seek immediate medical attention

Prevention

  1. Avoid wearing colorful or vibrant clothing when walking in the woods; you should wear white or green clothing and hat and pay attention to trees, grass, or dirt mound. 
  2. Avoid using fragrances such as perfumes or hair gels. 
  3. Wear a long-sleeve top, pants, and gloves. 
  4. Stay calm when faced with bee swarms. Move slowly, avoid striking the bees or quick movements. If you are unable to escape, lie down, and protect your head with your arms. 

Venomous snakebite

Symptoms

  • Haemotoxic snakes
  1. Localized reaction: Immediate burning sensation, swelling
  2. Systematic reaction: Gastrointestinal bleeding and hematuria
  • Neurotoxic snakes
  1. Localized reaction: Less swelling
  2. Systematic reaction: Coma and respiratory paralysis within 2-72 hours
     

Treatment

  1. Remember the snake's characteristics
  2. Stay calm and minimize your activity
  3. Remove your rings and bracelets 
  4. Immobilize the injured limb and make sure it is lower than your heart. Use an elastic bandage to tighten the near end but do not restrict blood circulation. 
  5. Seek medical attention immediately

Prevention

  1. Snakes usually do not attack people without being provoked. Keep your distance. 
  2. Hikers should wear long-sleeve tops, pants, boots, and gloves. 
  3. Avoid engaging in activities in the grass or near rocks in the morning or at night.

When encountering a black bear

If you see a bear in the wild and it has not spotted you yet, keep a safe distance and leave quietly as soon as possible to avoid startling the bear.

If you see a bear in the wild and it has not spotted you yet, keep a safe distance and leave quietly as soon as possible to avoid startling the bear.

  • If you see a bear in the wild and it has not spotted you yet, keep a safe distance and leave quietly as soon as possible to avoid startling the bear. 
  • According to studies, the probability of encountering a Formosan black bear in the wild is less than one out of 100 people per day. (Meaning that it will take about 100 days for one person in the wild to spot a black bear)
  • According to the researcher's experience, Formosan black bears exhibit 2 types of reactions when encountering people: 1. Avoid, 2. Intimidate (they will roar, stand up, or even move in on people for a short distance) before fleeing. 
  • When people and bear cross paths at a distance, the black bear tend to avoid people; when they encounter each other in close proximity, the black bear may exhibit intimidating behavior because it is startled or feels threatened. However, if people do not move in on the bear or show aggression, the black bear will usually turn around and flee. Consequently, if you encounter a bear in the wild, you should keep a safe distance to avoid startling the bear. You can exit quietly or stay put, but if the black bear begins to approach you, leave as soon as possible. 
  • Do not leave your food and trash in the cabin or campsite to prevent black bears from foraging for food and unintentionally damaging the cabin or park facilities. This also helps to minimize the chance of coming face to face with black bears. 
  • When on the move, look out around you if you are in the open. If you are in a spot with poor visibility, make a loud sound by coughing or yelling when the ridge turns to avoid an unexpected encounter with a bear. (If there are bears nearby, let them know that someone is coming)