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玉山群峰線

Tips for Mountaineering

Equipment

Equipment

  1. You need to know whether you will be mountaineering or hiking, the number of days of the trip, distance and slope of the trail, difficult and dangerous terrains along the way, and special equipment that will be needed.
  2. Bring lightweight, easy-to-use, and practical mountaineering and hiking equipment.
  3. Keep an eye on the weight of the equipment. The total should not exceed 1/3 of your body weight.
  4. The types of equipment can be divided into personal, group, winter climbing, and hiking. For details, please refer to the mountaineering equipment.

Food for mountaineering

Food for mountaineering

Food for mountaineering

  • Should be lightweight, preservable, and high-calorie.
  • Must contain three major nutrients (sugar, protein, and fat), minerals, and vitamins.
  • Easy to store, lightweight and easy to carry, and easy to cook to save fuel.
  • Prepare more foods that contain rich calories and salt.
  • Should prepare food for 2 additional days.
  • Eat the foods that are not as easy to preserve and heavier first.
  • Reduce the weight of food packaging to make foods easier to carry, and reduce the amount of garbage.
  • You can bring foods in a variety of flavors, salty, sour or spicy, to increase appetite.
  • Bring hiking foods such as candies and biscuits, and taking in salt and calories along the way for better preparation against emergencies.

Recommended foods for mountaineering

  • Staple foods (rice and noodles), non-staple foods (rations, sachima, chocolate, pineapple cakes, and others), vegetables (cabbage, green peppers, cucumbers, onions and others), fruits (apples, citrus fruits, grapes and small tomatoes), meat and fish (keep an eye on the preservation of meat, fish and sausage) and others (soup packets, oatmeal, coffee and tea bags, seasonings, salt and cooking oil).
  • For mountaineering food planning and preparation tips, please refer to mountaineering foods.

Climbing skills

  1. At the beginning of the trip, the stride should not be too long. Adjust the pace to make the speed consistent. Gradually make the pace faster and bring your knees and calves forward with your thighs. Maintain your balance and rhythm.
  2. Lean your upper body slightly forward, place your weight on your waist and keep your body balanced. Take firm steps and make sure your body weight is shared evenly by both feet. You can also use trekking poles to help you move forward.
  3. Take rest as needed but try not to take long breaks. Take 5 to 10 minutes for every one hour of activity and one longer break of 20 minutes for every 3 hours of walking.
  4. Going uphill can demand lots of energy and oxygen intake. You need to take deep and steady breaths and keep them consistent with your steps.
  5. Maintain a rhythmic speed when going downhill. You should not go too slowly in order to keep yourself in a warm-up state. You should not advance too quickly either, or you may trip or even fall down the trails.
  6. Do not rush when you are climbing up cliffs. Try to use your hands or legs to test the stability of the traction, and abide by the "maintain three points and move just one point" rule.
  7. Prepare full snow climbing equipment and receive proper training to have the skills to handle mountaineering during the snow season.
     

Mountaineering ethics

  1. Abide by the "Leave No Trace" principle to leave nothing except your footprints. Do not take anything but photos. Do not kill anything except time.
  2. Do not take shortcuts off trails. Sit on exposed rocks or soil surfaces when taking your break.
  3. Pick spots below the water source of your campground when you need to go to the toilet or adopt the cathole approach at places 50 meters away from the campsite.
  4. Do not make loud noises when staying in the lodge or campground. Keep the environment quiet.
  5. Occupying beds to place your food and cooking utensils is considered unethical behavior.
  6. Take your garbage and kitchen waste with you when you leave and leave nature the way it should be. Pits dug to bury wastewater or food waste can still attract wild animals, further destroying the ecology.
  7. Bring your own cooking utensils and fuel. Do not start a campfire.
  8. Do not bring dogs or other pets into the park as they may scare away or chase wild animals.

Climbing safety

Before the trip

  1. At the beginning of the trip, the stride should not be too long. Adjust the pace to make the speed consistent. Gradually make the pace faster and bring your knees and calves forward with your thighs. Maintain your balance and rhythm.
  2. Lean your upper body slightly forward, place your weight on your waist and keep your body balanced. Take firm steps and make sure your body weight is shared evenly by both feet. You can also use trekking poles to help you move forward.
  3. Take rest as needed but try not to take long breaks. Take 5 to 10 minutes for every one hour of activity and one longer break of 20 minutes for every 3 hours of walking.
  4. Going uphill can demand lots of energy and oxygen intake. You need to take deep and steady breaths and keep them consistent with your steps.
  5. Maintain a rhythmic speed when going downhill. You should not go too slowly in order to keep yourself in a warm-up state. You should not advance too quickly either, or you may trip or even fall down the trails.
  6. Do not rush when you are climbing up cliffs. Try to use your hands or legs to test the stability of the traction, and abide by the "maintain three points and move just one point" rule.
  7. Prepare full snow climbing equipment and receive proper training to have the skills to handle mountaineering during the snow season.
     

During the trip

  1. Obey the guidance offered by the team leaders and abide by all rules of the group.
  2. Stick to the itinerary plan and do not change it at will.
  3. You should stay with your companions at all times. Do not leave the group to travel alone or leave the route.
  4. Cook your meal at an open area free of weeds or dead branches, and be sure to know where the water source is. Before sleeping or leaving the site, please make sure that the cooking utensils and fire are put out completely to prevent fire disasters from occurring.
  5. Mountain areas are often covered with clouds and fog in the afternoon. You should not make frequent stops along the way and should try to get to the campground as soon as possible.
  6. Pay attention to the various landscape features along the way and verify your position and location during the break.
  7. Pay attention to the weather condition at all times. In the event of a typhoon or heavy rain, you should end your trip early or find shelter.
  8. It may be difficult to find water sources in the mountain areas. Fill your canteen whenever possible. Try not to drink large amounts of water when you are thirsty, take a few sips instead.
  9. Pay attention to the trail when you are on the move. Stop when you want to appreciate the surrounding view. Do not walk and look around at the same time.
  10. Help each other when you come across cliffs or rivers. Use climbing ropes if necessary.
  11. If you encounter bees, snakes, bears, or other animals, do not attack or scare them. Try to quickly leave the area or take a detour.
  12. After a meal and before sleep at the campground, pack your foods, so animals will not come for them.
  13. Please do not do river tracing in roadless valleys. If you find yourself lost, turn back to the original road or find shelters to wait for rescue and conserve your strength. Do not panic and wander around. Stick to this rule.
  14. If you experience bad weather, food shortage, mountain sickness, or other difficulties, try to establish contact with the outside to receive immediate rescue.